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Standard 1 – Welcoming All Families
Actions for making families feel welcomed, valued and connected to each other and the school.

Standard 2 – Communicating Effectively
The building blocks to effective communication between parents, schools and parent groups

Standard 3 – Supporting Student Success
Encouraging parent involvement to heighten student achievement

Standard 4 – Speaking Up for Every Child
Methods for becoming an effective advocate for children and their education

Standard 5 – Sharing Power
Ways to share power between families, students, teachers, school staff and the community

Standard 6 – Collaborating With Community
Resources for connecting the school with the community

PTA’s Vision:  Every child’s potential is a reality.

 PTA’s Mission:  To make every child’s potential a reality by engaging and empowering families and communities to advocate for all children.

History

Colorado PTA was founded in 1907 as the Colorado Congress of Mothers and  incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in 1915.  Since its founding, Colorado PTA has served as a nonsectarian, nonpartisan advocate for the child and for parental engagement.

As the volunteer-run, state chapter  of PTA, Colorado PTA acts as the link  between the national association, based in Alexandria, VA and the local school PTAs  (known as local units) located throughout the State of Colorado.

As a chartered, membership-based organization, each local unit, while maintaining its own autonomy, also benefits from being supported by this state and national structure which provides valuable information, resources and training.  Through this  structure, local unit members automatically obtain membership in both Colorado PTA and National PTA as well.

A PTA Code of Ethics

  As a PTA volunteer, I realize that I am subject to a code of ethics similar to that which binds the professional in the field in which I work. Like them, I assume certain responsibilities and expect to account for what I do in terms of what I am expected to do: I will keep confidential matters confidential.I interpret “volunteer” to mean that I have agreed to work without compensation in money, but having been accepted as a worker, I expect to do my work according to standards, as the paid staff expect to do their work.I promise to take to my work an attitude of open-mindedness; to be willing to be trained for it; to bring to it interest and attention.I realize that I may have assets that my co-workers may not have and that I shall use these to enrich the project at which we are working together.I realize also that I may lack assets that my co-workers have, but I will not let this make me feel inadequate but endeavor to assist in developing teamwork.I plan to find out how I can best serve the activity for which I have volunteered, and to offer as much as I am sure I can give, but no more.I realize that I must live up to my promise and therefore, will be careful that my agreement is so simple and clear that it cannot be misunderstood.  I believe that my attitude toward volunteer work should be professional. I believe that I have an obligation to my work, to those who direct it, to my colleagues, to those whom it is done, and to the public. – Author Unknown ~1993

National Standards for Family-School Partnerships Implementation Guide

The benefits of family-school-community partnerships are many: higher teacher morale, more parent involvement, and greater student success are only a few. That is why PTA developed the National Standards for Family-School Partnerships Implementation Guide, a tool for empowering people to work together with an end goal of building family-school partnerships and student success.

For each of the six National Standards for Family-School Partnerships, this online guide provides:

  • An explanation of each standard and its importance
  • Insights to help convince educators of the standard’s value
  • A success story from a school community
  • Action steps for your school community
  • Resources to enhance your understanding

The full guide, downloadable as a PDF, provides additional details, background, research, and success stories.

Who should use this guide?

Anyone with a stake in improving schools and student achievement can use this tool: PTA leaders, parents, school administrators, school board members, community organizations, and more.

Learn More Here!

Is Your PTA an ATM for Your School?

Have you ever felt that your PTA was an ATM for your school principal and teachers? Have you ever felt like your principal thought your PTA budges was his or her discretionary spending fund? Do you get requests from teachers and school staff to fund certain projects and items that really ought to be part of the school budget? You’re not alone. PTAs frequently turn over their funds to school administration for such basics as books, equipment, and maintenance, not to mention extras, such as playground equipment and vending machines. The customs that have developed between PTAs and schools have blurred the line about what PTAs are; what vision, mission, and purposes we follow; and how our funds should be used. Vision, mission, and purposes PTA’s vision is making every child’s potential a reality. PTA’s mission is to be A powerful voice for all children A relevant resource for families and communities A strong advocate for the education and well-being of every child PTA’s purposes, or historical goals are as follows: To promote the welfare of the children and youth in home, school, community, and place of worship To raise the standards of home life To secure adequate laws for the care and protection of children and youth To bring into closer relation the home and the school, that parents and teachers may cooperate intelligently in the education of children and youth To develop between educators and the general public such united efforts as will secure for all children and youth the highest advantages in physical, mental, social, and spiritual education How PTAs work The national PTA organization is...

Colorado PTA: A Statewide Voice for Children

Colorado PTA was founded in 1907 as the Colorado  Congress of Mothers and  incorporated as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization in 1915.  Since its founding, Colorado PTA has served as a nonsectarian, nonpartisan advocate for the child and for parental engagement. As the volunteer-run, state chapter  of PTA, Colorado PTA acts as the link between the national association, based in Alexandria, VA and the local school PTAs  (known as local units) located throughout the State of Colorado. As a chartered, membership-based organization, each local unit, while maintaining its own autonomy, also benefits from being supported by this state and national structure which provides valuable information, resources and   training.  Through this structure, local unit members automatically obtain membership in both Colorado PTA and National PTA as...

Purposes of PTA

Purposes of the PTA To promote the welfare of children and youth in home, school, community, and place of worship. To raise the standards of home life. To secure adequate laws for the care and protection of children and youth. To bring into closer relation the home and the school, that parents and teachers may cooperate intelligently in the education of children and youth. To develop between educators and the general public such united efforts as will secure for all children and youth the highest advantages in physical, mental, social, and spiritual education. PTA Mission The mission of the PTA is three-fold: To support and speak on behalf of children and youth in the schools, in the community and before governmental bodies and other organizations that make decisions affecting children; To assist parents in developing the skills they need to raise and protect their children; and To encourage parent and public involvement in the public schools of this...

Leveraging Networks of Support: A Unified Voice

The multi-level layered, organizational model of PTA provides its members with an extensive network of support as well as a unified voice.  The issues that affect our children extend beyond their individual schools.  PTA’s state and nationwide networks provide parents and teachers with a forum and tools to collectively influence the decisions that affect children not only at their schools, but also throughout their districts, within their state, and across the nation.  This mission is unique to the PTA. Did you know that Colorado PTA has nearly 25,000 members?  PTA membership expands to over 6 million when adding in all 50 states . In addition to its own nationwide network of members, Colorado PTA leverages its voice by advocating at the State Capitol and partnering and collaborating with reputable local, state and national education, health and advocacy organizations as well as state and federal government agencies....

Web Site Disclaimer

The Colorado PTA is providing information and services on the Internet as a benefit and service in furtherance of the Colorado PTA’s nonprofit and tax exempt status. Unless otherwise noted, PTAs may reproduce and distribute the materials from the Colorado PTA Web site without expressed written permission. Colorado PTA materials may not be duplicated by any other organization or person without written permission. The Colorado PTA does not exert editorial control over materials that are posted by third parties onto this site or materials that are emailed by third parties to any other persons. The Colorado PTA is not responsible for any material posted by any third party. The Colorado PTA specifically disclaims any and all liability for any claims or damages which result from any postings by third parties. Companies and/or products found on this Web site does not constitute endorsement. Although the Colorado PTA site includes links providing direct access to other Internet sites, the Colorado PTA has not participated in the development of those other sites, and does not exert any editorial or other control over those...